Communities rethink remote airstrip value at first attempt in Germany

Communities rethink remote airstrip value at first attempt in Germany

by Michael Tarnopolsky and Eric Rauch

Bundeswehr pilots are increasingly thinking of remote airstrips in더킹카지노stead of expensive and time-consuming ones, despite mounting evidence of their use by insurgents and enemy forces.

Airforce Maj. Peter Buell, the department’s director of air operations, argued at a July 26 event in Baden-Württemberg that the department is considering changing its thinking about remote airstrip values in Germany and elsewhere to focus on fewer of them. “We now have very limited knowledge in a lot of places where we need to put them [a remote airstrip],” he said, the Washington Examiner reported.

Buell’s remarks followed statements by Maj. John Kopp, director of the Air Force’s Air and Space Museum, that the Bundeswehr already was using the maximum number of remote airstrips possible.

Buell’s comment came at the start of the바카라 week’s Air Forces Day, an annual commemoration of the United States military’s “Warrior Eagle” programs, the largest of which is now the Global Hawk reconnaissance aircraft. The museum’s annual display features an array of American aircraft that were part of the Germa바카라n Focke-Wulf G.I.A.-designated aircraft, which played an instrumental role in Germany’s rise to independence. Many of the aircraft feature on one of the museum’s six World War II military aircraft that it’s also showing.

A report compiled by air force officials in July 2015 found that German Air Force forces were using a remote airstrip value of 9.7 square miles (25 square km) at some remote installations in the United States, but they could potentially use even more. The report, made public in July 2015, found remote airstrips at five different U.S. remote airports in northern Colorado, and said the value for the German locations was even lower, at 3.8 square miles (7.2 square km).

The report’s author, Maj. Gen. Mark Gerber, the director of the U.S. Army’s Northern Area Command, estimated that the total value of remote locations at remote U.S. air bases in 2013, and 2014, was around $1 billion. The report found some remote locations, but no location close to the U.S. mainland, where the U.S. Navy’s aircraft could land.